Skip to main content

Where do International Students Enroll in the US?

Here's some more interesting information from the IIE Open Doors Project, but this is not about where US students study overseas, but where students from overseas enroll in the US.  This is pretty simple, actually.

Each dot on the map represents a college or university (hover over for details).  The size of the dot represents the International Student population in 2012, and the color represents the percentage of enrollment at that college or university that is international (that is, on a J-1 or F-1 Visa, presumably; permanent residents are not considered international students.)  The bar charts below show every IHE with both the number of international students (right column) and percentage of all enrollment that is international (on the left.)

You can use the filters to narrow down the IHEs displayed, by choosing the number of international students, the percent international, or the percent of all enrollment that is international.  And you can sort the bar charts by hovering over the small icon that appears when you hover over the top of the bar chart.  Clicks cycle through displays.  The circular arrow at the bottom resets it all.

Note: The IIE data does not break out enrollment by graduate/undergraduate, so I cannot calculate the percentage of undergrads or graduate students who are international.  The only thing I can show is the total international population as a percentage of all students enrolled.



Comments

Popular posts from this blog

2018 Admissions Data

This is always a popular post, it seems, and I've had a couple of people already ask when it was going to be out.  Wait no more. This is IPEDS 2018 admissions data, visualized for you in two different ways.  You can switch using the tabs across the top. The first view is the universe of colleges and universities that report data; not every college is required to, and a few leave data out, and test optional colleges are not supposed to report test scores.  But IPEDS is not perfect, so if you find any problems, contact the college. On the first view, you'll see 1,359 four-year private and public, not-for-profit institutions displayed.  In order to make this as clean as possible, I've taken out some specialty schools (nursing, business, engineering, etc.) as many of those don't have complete data.  But you can put them back in using the filter at top right. Hover over any bar, and a little chart pops up showing undergraduate enrollment by ethnicity. You can also

So you think you're going back to the SAT and ACT?

Now that almost every university in the nation has gone test-optional for the 2021 cycle out of necessity, a nagging question remains: How many will go back to requiring tests as soon as it's possible?  No one knows, but some of the announcements some colleges made sounded like the kid who only ate his green beans to get his screen time: They did it, but they sure were not happy about it.  So we have some suspicions about the usual suspects. I don't object to colleges requiring tests, of course, even though I think they're not very helpful, intrinsically biased against certain groups, and a tool of the vain.  You be you, though, and don't let me stop you. However, there is a wild card in all of this: The recent court ruling prohibiting the University of California system from even using--let alone requiring--the SAT or ACT in admissions decisions next fall.  If you remember, the Cal State system had already decided to go test blind, and of course community colleges in

Yes, your yield rate is still falling

In 2015, I wrote this post on falling yield rates.  It was pretty obvious to many of us in the profession that this trend was widespread, and largely driven by a dramatic increase in applications against a more modest increase in actual students who could or would enroll. It apparently wasn't so obvious to everyone.  Response was much stronger than I thought it would be, and I never had seen so many requests from people who wanted to share it with their trustees (btw, this is public; you never have to ask permission to share). So I redid it, using trend data from 2005 to 2018.  First a couple of definitions: Admit rate is the percentage of applicants who were offered admission (admits/applicants). Yield rate is the percentage of admitted students who enroll (enrollers/admits). Draw rate is not commonly known, and I wish I remember who first mentioned it to me in the 1980's.  It stuck with me and is a valuable metric, I think, as we attempt to measure market posi